The Censored Exhibition

#CPFCELEBRATINGPHOTOGRAPHY

FRAMING VISION

Here at Copenhagen Photo Festival, we are excited to be supporting talented photo artists. After receiving 389 applications from 42 different countries, this year’s jury decided on 13 artists to be part of The Censored Exhibition at Copenhagen Photo Festival 2020. They too will be presented through our online campaign #CPFCELEBRATINGPHOTOGRAPHY.

The Censored Exhibition is a group show that seeks to present a contemporary selection of international fine art photography. The exhibition is part of the festival’s programme pillar Framing Vision, which focuses on the aesthetics and techniques of photographic expression.

This year’s international jury consisted of Kristine Kern, director of Fotografisk Center, Alain Bieber, artistic director of NRW-Forum Düsseldorf and Ángel Luis González Fernández, founder and CEO of PhotoIreland Festival.

Concerned to reach a gender and geographical balance in their selection, they collectively chose projects with a focus on nature and identity issues, highlighting the fact that the world is experiencing a crisis in several ways. The projects hence respond to the following two sections:

DISRUPTION – NATURE

POSTCOLONIAL IDENTITY – GENDER

The Censored Exhibition is supported by Det Obelske Familiefond and the City of Copenhagen.

DISRUPTION – NATURE

Is humanity a threat to nature ? How do people interact with and alter our environments? The series gathered in the first part of the exhibition not only deals with nature but also notions of time, space and perception.

Niels Østergaard Munk (Denmark)

Niels Østergaard Munk (Denmark)

Mo(nu)ment

2018

The series is about photographs as being both moments as well as monuments. The photographic act is always bound to a specific situation or moment. Meanwhile, the finished photograph is a monument for the specific moment, where the photo was taken – no matter if you had all the time in the world or just a fraction of a second. The series is also an image of myself in the photographic situation. Of looking with a camera, searching for the composition and investigating the limits of a motif. Besides, the cube itself is an image of the idea of a camera; the photos were taken with an analogue medium format camera, which in itself is a cubic space. Thus, we here have a monument in honor of the photographic moment.

Exhibited in this year’s Spring Exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg the Danish photographer has also captivated the Censored Exhibition jury. His series’ title is a pun on moment and monument. Imbued with the same humour, Munk’s work puts into pictures his own thoughts on the photographic practice as a special way of playing with time, scale and space.

Biography

Niels Østergaard Munk is a photographer and filmmaker currently studying at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Through filmmaking and photography his interests stretches across architecture, sculpture, performance and text. With simple yet tight concepts he investigates classical questions with a subtle humor and a sharp visuality.

INSTAGRAM
Willner - Olsson (Germany)

Willner – Olsson (Germany)

Heaps

2019

The duo Willner/Olsson work collaboratively on projects that evolves around processes of change in the landscape, changes that often lie hidden in plain sight. The series highlights the shape of an often overlooked player in the field.
The heap is showing evidence of both the past and actions in the present, initiated by humans or nature. It is one of our first and most basic architectural forms and at the same time it is a shape resulting from mere gravitation. A recognizable and repetitive shape that mirrors the singularities of a place. The heap is like the chorus in the ancient greek drama; the constant shape in an ever changing environment. The heap gives a political aspect on human endeavors; where the geographic position implicates a unique reason for its existence. Unrest, economy, environment or history. Today the body of work consist of mainly two parts. The first part presents ”found heaps” that you would find in the contemporary landscape. City or rural areas. Anywhere. Using the central perspective as method this series of photographs (ca 100) forms our basic research and gives us an archive. In this context the heap is highlighted as an artefact made by humankind. The second part consists of our ”heap studies” where we make experiments and deepen our understanding of the qualities of the heap. The studies are staged situations where we change the perspective from spectator (as in found heaps), to creators. In these staging we examine form, perception, gravity and temporality among other things. The heap studies is at the moment a body of 30 large format photographs experimenting with the concepts shape, perception and spatiality. Dig where you stand.

The Swedish duo Willner and Olsson’s very own aesthetic and their way of reflection have caught the jury’s attention. Visually, their work can be considered a combination of an abstract approach to both photography and landart. Thanks to the shape of the heap, their images show the changes in landscape initiated by man or nature over time as well as our perception of these changes.

Biography

The artist duo Willner – Olsson consists of Johan Willner and Peo Olsson. They have been collaborating since 2015, on a long-term project focusing on the landscape and its changes. Based on aspects such as democracy, activism and history, the work aims to illuminate processes of change t ​ Peo Olsson is a Swedish photographer. He focuses his work on processes of change and the human condition. The archive or collection is often a point of departure in his works, examining time, memory and the self. Educated at ICP in New York, and he also holds an MFA from School of Photography at the University of Gothenburg. He exhibits his work on a regular basis in Sweden and internationally. He published his first book ”Umbra Hominis” in 2014.Born 1973. Lives and works in Lund, Sweden Johan Willner is also a Swedish photographer. He works with both documentary and staged photography, and allows the subject or the concept to determine the technique. He has recently released his second book ”Wind Upon the Face of Waters” (Kerber/Skreid) a project about faith and religion. His first book ”Boy Stories” (Hatje Cantz) highlighted the childhood memory and was released in 2012. Educated at ICP in New York, and he also holds an MFA from The University Collage of Arts, Craft and Design in Stockholm. He exhibits his work on a regular basis in Sweden and internationally. Born 1971. Lives and works in Stockholm.

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Olya Pegova (Russian Federation)

Olya Pegova (Russian Federation)

Kunststück

2019

In the past, the faux facades were rare and temporary interventions in urban spaces, but today they have become a part of the city landscape, only being changed from time to time. 
 Looking at the windows, arches, and other architectural elements constructed in graphic editors and printed in great detail, it is impossible to tell what’s hidden behind the faux facades: a historical monument awaiting reconstruction, a building in a state of disrepair concealed from the public eye, new construction space or just an empty spot. 
A drawn-over reality fills in the modern city landscape, shaping our perception of the world. 
 In my work, I bring changes into the city landscape by means of digital editing, leaving the faux facades untouched. 
 The landscapes in the photographs look familiar, but it is no longer clear what actually exists and what has been changed digitally and now only deceptively resembles the reality.

When Alain Bieber walked in the streets of Dusseldorf, he recently stumbled upon one of the faux-facades hiding scaffoldings that we sometimes encounter in the city landscape. Bieber and the members of the jury were thus intrigued by Olya Pegova’s images, wondering: What is behind the faux-facades? Do these buildings exist? Thanks to digital manipulation, the Russian artist isolates the buildings and hereby creates a very clean aesthetic, but not without a humorous note, which also examines our sense of the surrounding environment and of its realness.

Biography

Olya Pegova (VeIiky Novgorod) is a visual artist working with photography lives and works in Moscow, Russia. The School of Modern Photography Docdocdoc student.
Winner The World Biennial of Student Photography, 3rd prize, Novi Sad, Serbia, 2019, the works were shown at international photographic festivals in Serbia and Russia.

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Ting Cheng (UK)

Ting Cheng (UK)

Little Odd Things 拐瓜劣棗

2018

Little Odd Things is a long-term creative project that uses photography and sculpture to highlight and rediscover the diversity and uniqueness in daily life. Cheng Ting gives commonly neglected things like misshapen fruit and vegetables, everyday disposable items and unappreciated objects at flea markets a possibility to be seen again. Root vegetables emerge from the ground after enduring all kinds of environmental changes, and those among them that differ from market selection criteria are often removed or excluded. The way Cheng Ting juxtaposes items of different materials not only retrieves their inherent uniqueness but also accentuates their absurd functionality and decorativeness, thus opening an imaginary dialogue between herself and her collections. Before fruit and vegetables start to rot, Cheng Ting first captures their uniqueness through photography, and then through sculpture, she completes the ritual of preservation.

We hardly ever see projects using both photography and sculpture. Ting Cheng has chosen to do so in order to get to the bottom of her own thoughts. Both intangible and palpable, her still lifes put together root vegetables and manufactured objects that have been rejected due to our consumerist society’s diktats, and she here gives them another try at beauty. She brings to light the uniqueness and diversity of their shapes and demonstrates their durability by artificially completing a ritual of preservation.

Biography

Taiwanese artist Ting Cheng, moved to London to study Photography at Goldsmiths College in 2010. She now works and lives in London and Taipei. She has been featured in numerous magazines and online media including Dazed Digital, Neon Magazine, and Bloomberg Businessweek. Her publications include “One and Two and Up and Down”, “Computer Says No” and “Baker Salon”. Her work has been exhibited across the globe in London (Saatchi gallery), Tokyo (Zen Foto Gallery), Sao Paulo (LOGO Gallery) and most recently at the 2018 Taiwan Biennial in National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts. Her early works constructed surreal encounters, and captured quirky daily life scenes with the lens. Recent works reflect the relationship between nature and the human, using sculpture and photography to side by side in an exhibition space, redefining the unique subtle existences in the daily environment.

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Jessica Auer (Canada)

Jessica Auer (Canada)

Looking North

2020

Following the economic crash of 2008 and the eruption of Iceland’s now infamous Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland became the country with the fastest growing rate of tourism in the world. Due to the sudden invasion of foreign visitors, and a deficiency in tourist infrastructure, Iceland’s landscapes are undergoing dramatic changes, many of which are irreversible. For the last 5 years, I have been documenting the impact of the tourism boom in Iceland with large and medium format film cameras. My photographs of Iceland bear witness to today’s travelers and the world created to accommodate them, as they blend in with the natural surroundings. The rise of the tourism phenomenon coincided with my relocation to Seydisfjördur in East Iceland. Originally from Montreal, Canada, I now live in a decommissioned fish factory. From my kitchen and studio windows, I watch cruise ships pass each day in summer, the number of ships arrivals dramatically increasing with every year. And as I continue to observe the evolution of tourism through the eyes of a foreigner and a local, I am striving to better understand the ambivalent feelings of Icelandic society towards the good and the bad that comes with tourism.

What is the impact of growing mass tourism in what used to be remote natural spaces? Reminding the jury of Martin Parr’s work on global tourism, Canadian photographer Jessica Auer documents this topical subject by playing beautifully with the idea of scale. She succeeds in capturing the vastness and the colours of the Icelandic landscapes and it’s contrast with the ones of human activity, with a dash of humour. 

Biography

Jessica Auer is a Canadian photographer and visual artist who works between Montréal, Québec and Seydisfjördur, Iceland. Her work is broadly concerned with the study of landscapes as cultural sites, focusing on themes that connect history, place, and cultural experience. Since receiving her MFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in 2007, Jessica has produced over a dozen photographic projects, published two books and produced three short films, which question our social, political and aesthetic attitudes towards place, especially in relation to globalization. These works have been presented in museums, galleries and festivals across Canada, the United States and Europe. She has participated in several international artist residencies including the Banff Centre in Alberta, The Brucebo in Sweden, The Chilkoot Trail AIR in Alaska and the Yukon Territory, the Skaftfell Centre for Visual Art in Seydisfjördur, Iceland, and Studio Kura in Japan. While in Montréal, Jessica teaches photography at Concordia University. While in Iceland, Jessica runs Ströndin Studio, a photographic research facility and educational institution in East Iceland.

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Ivan Murzin (Russian Federation)

Ivan Murzin (Russian Federation)

A world without latitude and longitude

2018

In a place called White Sands, New Mexico, you can get lost in no time on a cloudy, windy summer day as your footsteps are erased nearly as quickly as your bare feet make them. With no sun to guide you, it’s like being on another planet. The pull of places like that might be the same as the emotional grip that the tip of Mt. Everest has on champion climbers, or in the photographs of Ivan Murzin, the magnetic pull of a national park in Siberia where multitudes flock in winter to tempt gravity off the surface of an infinite tabletop of ice. Is it to slip away unnoticed that drives the psyche to experience such places — whether vicariously or through the intrepidness of others — or is it to simply affirm that we are alive? There are no answers on Google Maps, but the novelist Alan Lightman, in one crazy chapter of his classic bestseller, Einstein’s Dreams, does surmise: What if we lived in a world where people live forever, what other way would there be to end the millennia of boredom we would face otherwise than “dive into Lake Constance or hurl [ourselves] from Monte Lema.” Luckily, the edges of most continents are trimmed in utmost beauty. So, there’s no need to fret. Just take a deep breath, hope the ice holds, and exhale. As Ivan Murzin writes, “You are leaving childhood’s nest … to discover this life, your own path, moving further and further, without knowing where will you be later.” But to remain optimistic, he makes sure to add: “Enjoy the slide in the white infinity space.” text written by Arno Rafael Minkkinen

The works of Russian artist Ivan Murzin were to the jury a discovery. Murzin has succeeded in depicting the pure beauty of almost indiscernible spaces and in a way that makes these places seem almost otherworldly. The photographer plays with our ability to understand the image and questions human behaviour: Why do we want to reach these remote places? Is it a way of challenging nature by experiencing it in its most hostile state? Or do we want to disappear in infinity?

Biography

Ivan Murzin is a visual artist from Irkutsk, Siberia, Russia, who currently resides in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In 2019 he graduated as a Meisterschüler from the Academy of Fine Arts Städelschule, Germany. He works with a variety of media including, photography, video art, installations, woodcut printing and etching. His artistic practice mostly focuses on developing topics such as isolation, escapism, splits in societies, establishing different systems of relations, challenges, mistakes and issues stemming from the loss of voice and lack of communication, which he believes are fundamental to a joined and peaceful life. Ivan’s artworks have been presented in more than 40 exhibitions (solo and group shows) in various art spaces, institutions, galleries and museums in Germany, Denmark, Russia, Italy, Austria, and Switzerland. His work is held in private collections in Russia, Germany, Denmark and Luxemburg.

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AnneMette Elmelund (Denmark)

AnneMette Elmelund (Denmark)

Partus

2019

Fine art photographer AnneMette Elmelund has created a universe, where the beginning of life merges with nature. Small fragments from childbirths, are combined with trees, bark and water – and together they become one, wondrous tale.

The images are from Partus – a fine art, handmade photobook that AnneMette produced while she was a student at Copenhagen Film & Photography School in 2019. The photobook consists of 24 photographs and 8 of them has been selected to be part of The Censored Exhibition 2020.

Partus is currently an ongoing project.

Also participating in this year’s Spring Exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Danish artist AnneMette Elmegund’s images first caught the eye of the jury because of their crudeness. By putting side by side pictures of woods and of birth, she brings closer the human body and nature in a project that – without filter – unveils the origin of life.

Biography

AnneMette is an experienced midwife and a new, fine art photographer, based in Copenhagen, Denmark. She has always been fascinated by childbirth and through her profession as a midwife, she has come to gain a unique insight and understanding of that essential moment, when it all begins. She wishes to share that moment – as she sees it. She strives to create a window into a world that is hidden and mysterious, yet at the same time natural and an inevitable part of life. It is an ancient tale that is raw, powerful and wondrous.

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POSTCOLONIAL IDENTITY – GENDER

The series shown in the second part of the exhibition reveals how our identity is both shaped by and made out of many different elements. National historical narratives, gender roles as well as visual and sensitive memories are some instances of what makes up our identity and what causes it to be in constant evolution.

Cecilia Sordi Campos (Brazil)

Cecilia Sordi Campos (Brazil)

Tem Bigato Nessa Goiaba

2019

To live and to love is visceral. This image is part of the project Tem Bigato Nessa Goiaba. The project has been made as a means to understand the parallels between my migration from Brazil to Australia and my recent separation from my husband of 10 years. Drawing from aspects of Magical Realism and the Anthropophagic Manifesto, it focuses on exploring the layers that constitute my hybrid identity. These images were made without censorship and through them I share the disorders, choices and metamorphoses that have allowed me to simply live since I left my ex-husband. The images aim to have provocation and stimuli that deconstruct notions and customary ways of thinking. They also point out divergent paths that do not mix or unify; they affirm differences and diversity, fluidity and flexibility.

The project is a visual introspection that brings to light memories, relationships and choices… Put together, the series’ images constitute the deconstructed narrative of the photographer’s intense and eventful life, marked by migration and separation. The jury has been moved by her sincere and unfiltered way of untangling and disclosing the layers of her hybrid identity through photography.

Biography

Growing up in the countryside in Brazil, Cecila Sordi Campos got hold of a camera for the first time at age nine, after winning a contest at primary school. She took photos of everything and everyone. Unfortunately many of the rolls of film she went through were never developed. She still think of those never seen photographs. Cecilia is now a Melbourne based photographic artist and has been living in Australia for the past 13 years. Most of her work is autobiographical and explores peculiarities of her migrant experience, liminality and identity. She is also interested in the notions of intimacy and the spectrum of personal relationships. She am obsessed with moths.

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Ela Polkowska (Poland)

Ela Polkowska (Poland)

Firmly Pinch The Skin Together

2019

The series covers the tactile nature of the human experience as seen through the lens of tension and pressure. Its title references a medical phrase correlating a painful gesture to its healing function. The work consists of everyday moments of physical touch that communicate a sense of anxiety and intimacy. Touch, pleasure and pain all serve as messengers to our other senses, by slowly tracing the visceral journey of our emotions. The most meaningful reference of this project is the conception of the Skin-Ego by Didier Anzieu, where skin is treated as a metaphor – a wrapping that protects the interior but also connects with others, maintains the body in a state of unity and solidity, preserves the balance of our inner environment from external disturbances, but in its form and texture retains the marks of these disturbances.

At first glance, the jury has been hit by the strong, direct and emotional work of Ela Polkowska. The Polish artist takes raw pictures of everyday moments as a way to grasp the tactile nature of the human experience. Skin hereby becomes a protection of our inner self as well as a record of its encounters with the outside world and its perturbations. The body is shown as an outer shell which suggests who we are because it has kept the marks of our life’s experiences.

Biography

Photographer living in Warsaw, Poland. Interested in documenting people, places and objects on the margins of everyday life and subjects relegated from the dominant public memory or hidden from consciousness. Studied Art History and Film Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. In 2013 graduated from the Academy of Photography in Warsaw. From 2013 to June 2014 participated in the Mentorship Programme by Sputnik Photos, under the mentorship of Rafał Milach. From 2015 to 2019 student of photography at the Institute of Creative Photography in Opava, Czech Republic. Participant of the 2nd cycle of PARALLEL – European Photo based Platform. Her main projects are “Splinter”, a story of people living in continuous disorder and “When objects are always similar” about visual parallels between pictures. Now working on projects about the demolition of Orthodox churches in Poland in 1938 and “Firmly pinch the skin together” about tension, pressure and balance in everyday life.

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Emma Frisch (Germany)

Emma Frisch (Germany)

Me Myself & Emma

2019

I admit, that I was always confused, if not even a bit scared, when I met people with a transsexual background. I felt threatened in a way I couldn’t describe, insecure and not accepting. This has led me to a photographic journey which turned my world upside down. In order to understand my own insecurities, I started wondering about how society in general reacts to people who disrupt the core beliefs of gender. Being raised as a boy and growing up as a man, I started to dress as a woman in order to gather feedback of the people I meet. Little did I know about the journey that was (and still is) ahead of me. This project is not only about the question whether it is suitable for men to wear dresses. Changing your perceived gender changes your perspective on a lot of things, including your own identity, the society you life in or the value of your own life. Starting from self doubt, over the definition of unconditional love, all the way to the question of who we really are and what (or who) defines us as masculine or feminine, I am trying to translate all those questions into photographs with the help of my loving wife. Every photograph represents questions I have asked myself or situations I have been confronted with. Believing that gender identity is something people should not have to explain, I invite the viewer to ask their own questions. Therefore, I refrain from giving any descriptions of the images. This is an ongoing project, and and end of this experiment is not in sight. Not only, because I see this as an important subject in our time, but also because this project taught me how artificial and harmful it is to push people into certain gender roles. And this is exactly what photography, at least for me, is all about: Changing people’s perspective, and my own, on things that really matter.

Photography can be a formidable tool to question boundaries and to both literally and figuratively reflect on ourselves. Emma Frisch’s pictures are evidence of this. In a way reminiscent of Vivian Maier’s style, they are testimonies of her change of identity and perspectives as well as the challenges it entails in everyday life situations.

Biography

I was born and raised as a boy in the northern part of Germany. After trying to find my luck living as a heterosexual young man, I tried moving to Spain and living in a gay relationship. Somewhere in between I met my wife and moved to Ireland. Currently I’m living as a woman and photographer back home in Germany – all of which may change again at some point (or not). However, there is one constant in my life: The love for questioning boundaries. Photography gives me the best tools to reflect and change my own behaviour and encourage others to do the same.

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Gloria Oyarzabal (Spain)

Gloria Oyarzabal (Spain)

WOMAN GO NO’GREE

2019

Empires, by their very nature, embody and institutionalize difference, both between metropolis/colony and between colonial subjects.Imperial imaginary floods popular culture.Gender categories were one kind of bio-logic “new tradition” that European colonialism institutionalized in Yoruba, Igbo as well as other African cultures. Infantilization of women as part of Western patriarchal system was also exported with the colonization of the mind, configuring a state of vulnerability and making the path of dependency propitious.Can we assume social relations in all societies are organized around biological sexual difference? How do new realities affect new understandings of kinship, marriage and family as a result of status, class, sexuality, geography? Erotic, sisterhood, motherhood, marriage, tradition, domestication…all this aspects, nuances, with it’s own lights and shades in each society, should come out in the same level in order to compare. Beauty circulates as a form of commodity with social, economic and cultural value.However these norms are often measured with Eurocentric values, white beauty narratives and ideals of beauty (thinnes, youth,..) being strongly racialized. Whiteness is reinforced at the same time as the norm, while “otherness” becomes fetish and something “exotic”.One consequence of Eurocentrism is the racialization of knowledge: Europe is represented as the source of knowledge and Europeans, therefore, as thinkers. In addition, male privilege as an essential part of the European ethos is implicit in the culture of modernity. What if modernity models bring us to a new vision of “the other”?Stereotypes, clichés…..Will Western feminism be able to grow and evolve by observing and taking into account other community movements without a look of superiority and privilege as has happened up to now? Decolonize feminism questioning the Eurocentric rational theoretical frameworks that construct gender categories in a universalistic manner.

Gloria Oyarzabal has a unique and recognizable style which allows her to deliver a powerful and feminist message. Her colorful compositions of both her own works and manipulated archival images have been put on display in an original way, for example as hanged printed fabric. This creates a space that celebrates women and African cultures while also calling into question an eurocentric vision and gender norms, originating from colonialism and its Western patriarchal system.

Biography

Spanish artist photographer with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (UCM,1998) she diversifies her professional activity between photography, cinema and teaching. Programmer and co-founder of the Independent Cinema “La Enana Marrón”(The Brown Dwarf) Madrid (1999-2009) dedicated to the diffusion of author, experimental and alternative cinema. Graduated on Conservation & Restoration of Art (1993). Lived 3 years in Bamako, Mali (2009-2012) developing her interest on the construction of the Idea of Africa, History of colonization-decolonization, new tactics of colonialism and African feminisms. After her Master’s degree in Creation & Development of Photographic Projects at Blankpaper School of Photography (2014-15) her work has been shown at Organ Vida (Zagreb,Cr)

WEBSITE / INSTAGRAM/FACEBOOK
George Selley (UK)

George Selley (UK)

Human Exploitation

2019

In 1996, the US Department of Defence released declassified excerpts of a manual entitled, The Human Resource Exploitation Training Manual. The manual had been a standard textbook for students at the US Army School of the Americas (SOA); an American military training academy set up in Panama in 1946, which trained Latin American soldiers using techniques that were compatible with United States military customs and traditions. More than 60,000 Latin American soldiers have been trained at the School of the Americas, and in all, 11 dictators have attended its courses – among them, some of the region’s most notorious human rights abusers, such as Salvadoran death-squad leader Roberto D’Aubuisson; Leopoldo Galtieri, Efraín Ríos Montt; Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega; Domingo Monterrosa,; Guatemalan Colonel Julio Alpirez, and Honduran General Luis Alonso Discua, who commanded an army death squad known as Battalion 3-16. Despite this truly shocking list of human rights abusing alumni, US army officials identify these men as “a few bad apples”. In response to this, I have created a series of collages, using images from the University of Milwaukee Photography Archive – of two early to mid 20th century American geographers: Isaiah Bowman, and Eugene Vernon Harris. Bowman and Harris were using photography to chart, map and document Latin America on behalf of the American Geographical Society, and the US Foreign Service respectively. However, Bowman and Harris’ images are presented here in edited form, paired with extracts of text from the Human Exploitation manual given to students at the SOA. An air of suspicion and mystery is created; people are physically removed, and attention is drawn to banal objects that become menacing. When these edited collages are sequenced, they create a dark, almost poem-like narrative, reminding us that things aren’t always as they seem, whilst attempting to convey the militarisation of young Latin American soldiers by a US military academy.

The work of George Selley is qualified by the jury as a new form of forensic photography. In his project, the artist pairs edited archive picture with extracts of text from the Human Exploitation Training Manual, which was given to students at the US Army School of the Americas (SOA) which, from 1946, trained Latin American soldiers. Doing so, he carries out a visual and poetic study on official narratives, for the purpose of investigating the untold historical moments.

Biography

George Selley (born 1993) is a London based photographer, filmmaker and Parallel Photo Platform 3rd Cycle Artist. George currently teaches photography at Fine Arts College, in Camden. He is a recent graduate of MA Photojournalism & Documentary Photography at the London College of Communication. Having begun his further education in Anthropology, (Bsc Social & Biological Anthropology, Oxford Brookes, 2015), George’s work continues to be heavily researched based, but with conceptual elements often present. His work has been published in Dazed, Huck, The British Journal of Photography, Art Press and Fisheye Magazine. George received the Paris Photo Carte Blanche Student Award in 2017. He was also nominated for the HSBC Prix de la Photographie 2019, and was a finalist in the Fujifilm Young Talent Award as well as the Felix Schoeller Best Emerging Photographer Award 2017. He has been exhibited at the Felix Nussbaum Museum of Cultural History, Germany; The Grand Palais at Paris Photo 2017; the Fondazione Marangoni Gallery in Florence, Italy, the Ostrołęka Festival of Photography, in Poland, Odesa Photo Festival, Ukraine and the Green Rooms Gallery in London. His 2015 documentary Study Drugs was selected and screened at the 2015 American Public Health Association Film Festival, in Chicago. George is a co-founder of the Carte Blanche Collective, and a member of Inpro Photography Collective.

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Caroline Heinecke (Germany)

Caroline Heinecke (Germany)

Herr Der Dinge

2019

Lord of things Regine von Chossy from Munich collects and exhibits hair in her own hair museum with dated and signed hair donations. The photographer Karl Ludwig Lange collects bricks because the stamps give him information about the local history of his surroundings and Navena Widulin from Berlin collects gallstones and thus continues a tradition in the museum laboratory of the Berlin Medical History Museum of the Charite, Berlin. Of all the motives that move people inside and make them act, there is hardly one that does not have its cause in collecting. By accumulating and demonstrating different kinds of things, people gain orientation, live out their passion, but also their vanity and their drive for power. Objects have always been selected and amassed, whether for use or as an object for pure viewing, and information has always been collected, for exchange and as a basis for decisions to be made. But especially in an age in which information is gathered to increase capital and capital is increased by accumulating data, I would like to turn away from this trend and turn to those collections that are not just a reflex of human instincts and drives. With my work, I would like to dedicate myself to those collections that are devoid of the idea of utilitarianism, those whose motive is perhaps not obvious and which at first glance may seem a bit remote or bizarre. Due to the mysterious nature of his intention, the collector becomes an object just as much as his treasures, the object of our perception and our amazement.

In this series, selected for both its theme and its execution, Caroline Heinecke looks closely at the idea of collection with a very cinematic visual approach. She scrutinizes this practice, which is not only pure human instinct. In a time of intangible data collection, the German artist lets us walk into her photographic cabinet of curiosities, demonstrating that the collection of objects says something about ourselves.

Biography

Under the direction of Caroline Heinecke, underrated supporting actors get long overdue leading roles. Every actor escapes his trivial existence to express him or herself in the spotlight. Unexpected strengths and talents are individually highlighted, so that all actors are given a tailor-made part. Objecthood is an essential criterion for the cast of each scene.

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