Worlds connected – interview with solo artist Chloé Milos Azzopardi in Aesthetica

The opening of this year's festival is rapidly approaching and we look forward to exhibit the work by Paris-
based photographer Chloé Milos Azzopardi with her latest project, Non Technological Devices. Get ready for the show by learning more about the artist in this exclusive article published by our partners at Aesthetica Magazine. Here, Azzopardi speaks about her ecologically engaged practice and sci-fi inspirations. Plus, you can take look at dreamlike images from her back catalogue.

Image Credit: Chloé Milos Azzopardi, 2022

Chloé Milos Azzopardi (b. 1994) caught the art world’s attention with Les formes qu’ils habitent en temps de crise (2022), a “futuristic fable” about how we can reconnect with the natural world post-Capitalocene. Here, Azzopardi riffed on a concept that entered the vernacular in 2016 after historian Jason W. Moore’s Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism – a book which argues that the Earth entered a new era – the Capitalocene – in the 19th  century. According to Moore, contemporary crises are, all too often, rooted in “The Age of Capital.” Azzopardi’s photographic series imagined new interspecies relationships flourishing in an idyllic world: butterflies balancing on fingertips and nude figures emerging from the undergrowth. The power of nature was front and centre, with lightning strikes over horizon lines and a colour palette awash with deep greens and dreamy mauves.

From Copenhagen to Arles

Now, Azzopardi is touring a new project: Non-Technological Devices. The next stop is Copenhagen Photo Festival, and it’s a great fit for her ecologically-engaged practice. This year’s theme is Entanglement, highlighting artists who are making work that reflects how human beings, their environments and their actions are “co-dependently connected.”

Enter Azzopardi’s series of black-and-white images, showing low-tech sculptures made from natural materials. It has seen huge success over the past 12 months, travelling from Bristol to Melbourne, and, in July, it will land at Rencontres d’Arles, France’s iconic photography festival. In one shot, a wooden exoskeleton is layered over a hand. In another, an ice block takes the place of a virtual
reality headset. The idea: to make us think about the future of technology in a world stripped of resources – an idea that looms over us all as we continue to navigate the climate crisis.

Read the full article and interview with the artist here.